How to Keep Your Kids Healthy this Winter

There’s no denying the fact that you have concerns about your kids’ health and well-being during the winter months (just like every other season). 

While it’s natural to have concerns, it’s nice to know there are steps you can take to keep them healthy and happy during this time of the year.

If you’re struggling for ideas and have simply hoped for the best in the past, here are five tips you can use:

1. Wash Those Hands! 

This goes for both you and your children. Yes, it can be a difficult habit to teach your children, but it’s well worth it in the long run. It can be the difference between your child always being sick and them making it through the winter months unscathed.

Encourage your children to wash their hands both at home and while out of the house, such as during school hours or visiting with friends and extended family.

This is one of the easiest things a person can do to reduce the risk of contracting an illness and/or spreading germs. Help your children develop this habit early in life, as it’ll stick with them well into the future. 

Note: there is a right and wrong way to wash your hands. Here is a resource to ensure that you’re doing it correctly. If you’re not doing it right, it won’t do you much good.

2. Don’t Forget About Skin and Hair Health

As you’re well aware, the winter months will drain your skin and hair of moisture. Subsequently, it takes a dedicated approach to keep it healthy until warmer weather arrives.

So, it’s safe to say that this is an issue your children are dealing with, too. 

Look into the many products that are available to fight dryness, such as natural hair oil and hair moisturizer. Healthy hair and skin will make your children more comfortable, while also taking one less thing off their mind.

3. Make Sure They Eat Right

When your children eat immune-boosting foods (and consume immune-boosting drinks), they’re better positioned to fight off anything that comes their way.

In addition to fruits and vegetables, other foods to incorporate into their diet include yogurt, garlic, and beef. 

Regardless of the time of year, it’s not always easy to get your children to eat right. However, when you mix immune-boosting foods and drinks into their diet, it definitely helps. And who knows, they may even find a few healthy foods that they actually enjoy!

4. Make Sure They Get Enough Sleep

Just the same as managing their diet, getting your children to follow a sleep schedule is a challenge. This is particularly true if your child is the type who likes to go to bed late and rise early.

Keep in mind that children require more sleep than adults—seven to eight hours is not enough. For instance, a child between the age of 5 and 10 requires roughly 10 to 11 hours of sleep per night. 

Sleep is when the body heals and repairs itself, so it’s essential to the overall health and well-being of your children.

5. Limit Sugar Intake

Yes, your children probably love sugary treats such as cake, brownies, and candy. And while it’s okay to give it to them every now and again, be careful about how often.

Too much sugar suppresses the immune system and causes inflammation, both of which make your child more likely to contract the flu, a cold, or another type of virus. 

Don’t let your child go overboard on how much sugar they ingest. One treat per day is more than enough.

Final Thoughts

Are you the person primarily in charge of taking care of your children—as well as elderly members of your family—during the long, cold winter months?

If so, strongly consider the benefits of implementing the five tips above. Not only will it put your kids on the right path over the months to come, but it’ll also give you peace of mind.

Should you still have concerns, consult with your child’s doctor to ask questions and obtain guidance and advice. You never know when you’ll come across a nugget of information that better positions your child to make it through the winter months happy and healthy. 

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